Posting a message to the forum will remove the above advertisement
  1. Checkout our Plumbers Insurance area - heavily discounted Public Liability Insurance and Van Insurance specifically designed for plumbers.

Discuss Testing for leaks in oil line in the Oil and Solid Fuel Forum area at UKPlumbersForums.co.uk.

  1. Oilboil

    Oilboil New Member

    I wonder if someone can reassure me about this...

    Our domestic oil tank was recently found to be empty many weeks ahead of schedule. There was no sign of theft and our engineer queried a leak in the underground upvc pipe that links the tank to the boiler.

    He isolated the tank and using a Rothenberger pump pressurized the line to 24 bar. Just over two days later this is down to 10 bar.

    He assures me that this drop is normal but I have two worries:

    1. He appears to think that he only applied just over 2 bar of pressure

    2. As far as I can from some light Googling, these lines should not have more than about 8bar applied for more than three hours

    Please reassure me that the test as described above is appropriate and unlikely to have caused (further) damage to the line.

    Many thanks in advance
     
  2. Dotty

    Dotty Guest

    You sure it weren't 2.4 and 1.0 bar?
     
  3. Oilboil

    Oilboil New Member

    That's what I thought at first but the original "24" setting corresponded to around 350psi on the pump's guage.
     
  4. Dotty

    Dotty Guest

    If it was copper or steel it should only be pressured to 1.0 bar and checked for a drop after 15 minutes. If a drop is detected then the pipework should be exposed and replaced. If no loss is detected then the test should be left on for a further 30 minutes.

    Plastic pipework is dependant on the manufacturers recommendations. I don't believe any manufacturer would advise 24 bar over a period of days!
     
    • Like Like x 3
  5. SimonG

    SimonG Trusted Plumber

    Which is one reason underground pipework should be sleeved. Leak would be visible at atleast one end of the sleeving. Which would also be easy to replace the line through the sleeving.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  6. Dotty

    Dotty Guest

    I've just looked at Qual-Oil pipe manufactured by Pipelife.

    Exactly the same test as above.

    Not sure what your boys thinking is....
     
  7. Dotty

    Dotty Guest

    Amen to that. Costs a wee bit more but by 'eck does it save some hassle!
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. Best

    Best Trusted Plumber Top Contributor!!

    As above ^^ the blue water pipe, 20mm or 25mm normally and have it above ground a few inches at each end and that will allow any leak to show. Common sense method that should have been made compulsory years ago.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. Best

    Best Trusted Plumber Top Contributor!!

    Think it is just about a pound a metre, so not much on a job. I prefer to still use pvc coated copper oil line and put it inside 25mm water pipe
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. SimonG

    SimonG Trusted Plumber

    That's all I use. 10mm pvc coated copper inside 25mm alkathene.

    Had one in January. Only a couple of metres, but the old pulled out and new through with no hassle.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. SimonG

    SimonG Trusted Plumber

    That's all I use. 10mm pvc coated copper inside 25mm alkathene.

    Had one in January. Only a couple of metres, but the old pulled out and new through with no hassle.
     
  12. Oilboil

    Oilboil New Member

    Thanks for the replies. The line is in a pvcu conduit so replacement should be straightforward. I suspect replacement would not have been necessary 48 hours ago. Will try and post photo of the pressure guage just to double check.
     
  13. Best

    Best Trusted Plumber Top Contributor!!

    You were lucky it wasn't the old 3/8" alkathene pipe I used to use with bare 10mm copper pushed through it! :smile: Was near a tight fit and the longer the run of pipe, the tighter it became to push through.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  14. Oilboil

    Oilboil New Member

    Here's a photo of the gauge from a little over 24 hours ago. The red needle was the starting pressure and the black one where it fell to over the following 24 hours. It's now a little bit lower than that.

    By my reading it is 24 bar/350 psi/2.5 MPa - or am I wrong.

    If the oil line is Qual-oil - and I think it is, this pressure would invalidate the warranty - so I'm guessing that it would need to be replaced - and likely at the engineer's expense...
    20170310_193011.jpg

    Not sure if that worked, here's a link to the image:
    https://s14.postimg.org/6iqv9kn0h/20170310_193011.jpg
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2017
  15. Last Plumber

    Last Plumber Plumber GSR Top Contributor!!

    Whilst you're on this subject, does nobody test oil lines with a vacuums guage anymore ?
     
Loading...
Similar Threads - Testing leaks line Forum Date
Kane tightness testing Gas Safe Registered Plumbers Only Dec 21, 2017
Checking for leaks in new pipework Plumbing Forum Feb 10, 2018